2016 End of Session Letter

Dear Constituents,

The end of our 2016 Legislative Session is just around the corner—predictions are we’ll finish our work before Easter, so I thought you would be interested in some highlights of our efforts. As of March 17th, the Senate reviewed 267 drafts of bills, with 233 of those advancing at least part way into the process, and, 101 passed and sent to the Governor.

Some of the more interesting issues we dealt with are sex ,guns, education, abortion, suicide prevention, and urban renewal. We are also still waiting for end-of-session bills.

Sexting (H555): right now, if a person under 18 takes an explicit photo of themselves and sends it to a someone else, each of them can be charged with a felony and be required to register as a sex offender. This law reduces the first offense to a misdemeanor, no registry, and allows for helpful intervention.

Guns (S1389): Open carry without a permit in Idaho has been legal for many years. Concealed carry outside of city limits was made legal last year, so hunters and outdoor recreation folks can carry for safety while wearing warm coats. This new bill, permitless carry, allows gun owners with no felonies, mental illness or other restrictions, to conceal carry within city limits, except where already banned, such as on school grounds or areas of college campuses. Thirteen other states have this law and report no increase in gun accidents or crime. I am working with others on legislation for a gun safety class in our public schools, and we will encourage more training for gun owners who must still have permits to carry across state lines.

Education & Economic Development: K-12 education funding increased by a substantial 7.4%, with higher education funding up 8%. Just throwing money at education is not effective, but this funding covers required steps on the teacher career ladder, as well as several creative programs to energize the system, somewhat, and offer innovative options. You can read more about the specifics at my web site: MarySouzaforIdaho.com. Education is one of the best economic development tools we have, and many of the new options we approved this year give industry the opportunity to offer scholarships to students pursuing certain careers. More and better jobs, and increased business opportunities—that’s a good pairing for Idaho.

Abortion (H516): This bill requires abortion clinics to provide a list of free ultrasound providers to any woman considering an abortion. The list is compiled by the Idaho Dept. of Health and Welfare, and the information a mother gains from an ultrasound can help her make a more informed decision.

Suicide Prevention (S1326): This bill adds suicide prevention to the list of responsibilities of the Dept. of Health and Welfare, which can give then assist in this important endeavor. It’s a small change which will bring positive results.

Urban Renewal (H606): As many of you know, I have been working for a more responsible use of urban renewal. On the Legislative Interim Committee to study urban renewal this year, we finally agreed on some significant changes which will offer more local control and increase accountability. The committee supported the final draft, which was then sent to the House to start through the legislative process. As of today, the final week of the session, the urban renewal bill is still in the House and we have not seen it in the Senate. Chances are slim it will finish this year, so it will be revived next session. It’s sad to see but not a surprise, knowing the many power players trying to influence the outcome. We’ll try again.

There were four bills I personally sponsored this session. One of them succeeded and is on the Governor’s desk right now. That bill is #S1293, Parental Rights in Education. It requires schools to invite parents into their child’s education by offering information about homework, discipline, learning materials and more. It also defines what “reasonable accommodations” parents can expect from the schools, along with common sense limitations for schools, teachers and other students.

My other three bills were all election bills designed to increase transparency and allow voters better access to elections and campaign finance information. They did not make it through the system this year, but , as many bills take multiple attempts, we will bring them back again next year.

And so, good constituents, we are in the last week of the session, and still facing a number of very important issues. Foster care reform will come before us tomorrow along with a dozen others, and the final two big topics of the year are health care and taxes. Both have been discussed back and forth between the House and Senate conceptually for weeks, but no bills have come to the Senate side yet.

These are very complex topics. Health care this year is dealing with “the gap”. People in the gap are those who make too much to be on Medicaid, and too little to be covered on the Exchange. The Federal government wants states to expand Medicaid coverage to everyone in the gap, but there’s great concern about more dependence on the Federal government and the very real possibility that the Feds will cut back on their funding of this expensive program in the future, leaving Idaho taxpayers to pick up the tab. There’s also great frustration about the quality of Medicaid (not Medicare) in terms of finding a doctor, delayed appointments, long waiting times and much more. There was an innovative first-step program called PCAP, supported by the state administration and worked on by many for months. It would offer family clinic coverage for the gap population, but that program is now dead in the House. I liked the idea but it did not get over to the Senate.

Taxes: There is an effort to find a tax bill most people can accept, but it is late in the session and the proposed bills seem to have something everyone doesn’t like. The most likely bill collects taxes on internet sales and offers a slight reduction in income tax? Sometimes doing nothing is best.

Right to Try (H481): This bill allows terminally ill people, in conjunction with their doctors, to try new, experimental medications which have passed the FDA’s first phase of testing but have not et been fully approved. It offers an important option to patients and families.

 

It is a great honor to be here in the Senate representing you. The challenge is great and the work is incredibly important. Please send me your thoughts and concerns on any subject or legislation. You can email me at MSouza@senate.idaho.gov . You can also find information on legislation from this session, watch video of House or Senate floor sessions from this year, or listen to audio of committee meetings, all of those can be found at Legislature.idaho.gov

With great appreciation for Idaho,

Mary Souza